Asthma Children Science

Associations of household renovation materials and periods with childhood asthma, in China: A retrospective cohort study.
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Associations of household renovation materials and periods with childhood asthma, in China: A retrospective cohort study.

Environ Int. 2018 Feb 14;113:240-248

Authors: Zhang J, Sun C, Liu W, Zou Z, Zhang Y, Li B, Zhao Z, Deng Q, Yang X, Zhang X, Qian H, Sun Y, Sundell J, Huang C

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is prevalent in China. However, there is a lack of evidence on whether household renovation, including the materials used and the periods, are associated with the disease.
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the associations between household decoration materials and renovation periods, and childhood asthma and its related symptoms.
METHODS: During 2010-2012, a retrospective cohort study was initiated in seven cities of China, and 40,010 children, aged 3-6 years, were recruited. Data on demographics, health status, and home decoration conditions were collected using a parent-administered questionnaire. Two-level (city-child) logistic regression analyses with adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were performed to show the target associations. Sensitivity analysis was performed by stratifying data for children in the southern and northern cities.
RESULTS: Children whose homes underwent renovation or the addition of new furniture within 1 year before pregnancy, during pregnancy, at age 0-1 year, and after age 1 year had significantly (p < 0.05) higher prevalence of childhood asthma and its related symptoms. The use of solid wood floors and wallpaper had significant associations (cement: AOR, 95% CI: 1.59, 1.17-2.17; lime: AOR, 95% CI: 1.31, 1.00-1.71) with an increased risk of lifetime asthma. Household renovation and the addition of new furniture during pregnancy had significant associations with lifetime asthma (renovation: AOR, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.01-1.51); lifetime wheeze (renovation: AOR, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.05-1.39; furniture: AOR, 95% CI: 1.24, 1.14-1.36), current wheeze (renovation: AOR, 95% CI, 1.21 1.05-1.40; furniture: AOR, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.12-1.34), and current dry cough (renovation: AOR, 95% CI: 1.41, 1.23-1.63; furniture: AOR, 95% CI: 1.28, 1.17-1.41). Similar associations were found between the addition of new furniture during early childhood and lifetime asthma and its related symptoms. Except for the association between lifetime wheeze and flooring materials, the studied associations were generally stronger among children from the northern cities.
CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed that using cellulose based materials in home decoration and renovation, and adding new furniture during early childhood and pregnancy could be risk factors for childhood asthma. The association between household decoration during early childhood and childhood asthma may be stronger in the northern cities of China.

PMID: 29454245 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



Parent-reported prevalence and persistence of 19 common child health conditions.
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Parent-reported prevalence and persistence of 19 common child health conditions.

Arch Dis Child. 2018 Feb 16;:

Authors: Liu T, Lingam R, Lycett K, Mensah FK, Muller J, Hiscock H, Huque MH, Wake M

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate prevalence and persistence of 19 common paediatric conditions from infancy to 14-15 years.
DESIGN: Population-based prospective cohort study.
SETTING: Australia.
PARTICIPANTS: Parallel cohorts assessed biennially from 2004 to 2014 from ages 0-1 and 4-5 years to 10-11 and 14-15 years, respectively, in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 19 health conditions: 17 parent-reported, 2 (overweight/obesity, obesity) directly assessed. Two general measures: health status, special health care needs.
ANALYSIS: (1) prevalence estimated in 2-year age-bands and (2) persistence rates calculated at each subsequent time point for each condition among affected children.
RESULTS: 10 090 children participated in Wave 1 and 6717 in all waves. From age 2, more than 60% of children were experiencing at least one health condition at any age. Distinct prevalence patterns by age-bands comprised eight conditions that steadily rose (overweight/obesity, obesity, injury, anxiety/depression, frequent headaches, abdominal pain, autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder). Six conditions fell with age (eczema, sleep problems, day-wetting, soiling, constipation, recurrent tonsillitis), three remained stable (asthma, diabetes, epilepsy) and two peaked in mid-childhood (dental decay, recurrent ear infections). Conditions were more likely to persist if present for 2 years; persistence was especially high for obesity beyond 6-7 (91.3%-95.1% persisting at 14-15).
CONCLUSIONS: Beyond infancy, most Australian children are experiencing at least one ongoing health condition at any given time. This study's age-specific estimates of prevalence and persistence should assist families and clinicians to plan care. Conditions showing little resolution (obesity, asthma, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder) require long-term planning and management.

PMID: 29453208 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



Caring for the Student With Asthma at School: What's Out There to Help the School Nurse?
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Caring for the Student With Asthma at School: What's Out There to Help the School Nurse?

NASN Sch Nurse. 2018 Mar;33(2):84-86

Authors: Haas-Howard C, Schoessler S

Abstract
Asthma is a high impact health issue in the school setting. One in 10 children comes to school with asthma, and it is the leading cause for absenteeism causing 13.8 million missed school days each year. Where can the school nurse turn for help? The following article provides evidence-based resources to assist school nurses in caring for their students with asthma.

PMID: 29452552 [PubMed - in process]



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