Asthma Children Science

Severe Pertussis Infections in the United States, 2011-2015.
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Severe Pertussis Infections in the United States, 2011-2015.

Clin Infect Dis. 2018 Oct 15;:

Authors: Mbayei SA, Faulkner A, Miner C, Edge K, Cruz V, Peña SA, Kudish K, Coleman J, Pradhan E, Thomas S, Martin S, Skoff TH

Abstract
Background: The incidence of pertussis in the United States has increased in recent years. While characteristics of severe pertussis infection have been described in infants, fewer data are available in older children and adults. In this analysis, we characterize pertussis infections in hospitalized patients of all ages.
Methods: Cases of pertussis with cough onset from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2015 from 7 U.S. Emerging Infections Program Network states were reviewed. Additional information on hospitalized patients was obtained through abstraction of the inpatient medical record. Descriptive and multivariable analyses were conducted to characterize severe pertussis infection and identify potential risk factors.
Results: Among 15,942 cases of pertussis reported, 515 (3.2%) were hospitalized. Three hospitalized patients died. Infants aged <2 months accounted for 1.6% of all pertussis cases but 29.3% of hospitalizations. Infants aged 2-11 months and adults aged ≥65 years also had high rates of hospitalization. Infants aged <2 months whose mothers received Tdap during the 3 rd trimester and children aged 2 months to 11 years who were up to date on pertussis-containing vaccines had a 43-66% reduced risk of hospitalization. Among adolescents aged 12-20 years, 43.5% had a history of asthma and among adults and ≥65 years, 26.8% had a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Conclusions: Individuals at the extreme ends of life may be the most vulnerable to severe pertussis infections, though hospitalization was reported across all age groups. Continued monitoring of severe pertussis infections will be important to help guide prevention, control, and treatment options.

PMID: 30321305 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



Epidemiology, clinical presentation and respiratory sequelae of adenovirus pneumonia in children in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
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Epidemiology, clinical presentation and respiratory sequelae of adenovirus pneumonia in children in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

PLoS One. 2018;13(10):e0205795

Authors: Lim LM, Woo YY, de Bruyne JA, Nathan AM, Kee SY, Chan YF, Chiam CW, Eg KP, Thavagnanam S, Sam IC

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe the severity, human adenovirus (HAdV) type and respiratory morbidity following adenovirus pneumonia in children.
METHODOLOGY: Retrospective review of children under 12 years of age, admitted with HAdV pneumonia, between January 2011 and July 2013, in a single centre in Malaysia. HAdV isolated from nasopharyngeal secretions were typed by sequencing hypervariable regions 1-6 of the hexon gene. Patients were reviewed for respiratory complications.
RESULTS: HAdV was detected in 131 children of whom 92 fulfilled inclusion criteria. Median (range) age was 1.1 (0.1-8.0) years with 80% under 2 years. Twenty percent had severe disease with a case-fatality rate of 5.4%. Duration of admission (p = 0.02) was independently associated with severe illness. Twenty-two percent developed respiratory complications, the commonest being bronchiolitis obliterans (15.2%) and recurrent wheeze (5.4%). The predominant type shifted from HAdV1 and HAdV3 in 2011 to HAdV7 in 2013. The commonest types identified were types 7 (54.4%), 1(17.7%) and 3 (12.6%). Four out of the five patients who died were positive for HAdV7. Infection with type 7 (OR 8.90, 95% CI 1.32, 59.89), family history of asthma (OR 14.80, 95% CI 2.12-103.21) and need for invasive or non-invasive ventilation (OR 151.84, 95% CI 9.93-2.32E) were independent predictors of respiratory complications.
CONCLUSIONS: One in five children admitted with HAdV pneumonia had severe disease and 22% developed respiratory complications. Type 7 was commonly isolated in children with severe disease. Family history of asthma need for invasive or non-invasive ventilation and HAdV 7 were independent predictors of respiratory complications.

PMID: 30321228 [PubMed - in process]



Respiratory morbidity in children with cerebral palsy: an overview.
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Respiratory morbidity in children with cerebral palsy: an overview.

Dev Med Child Neurol. 2018 Oct 15;:

Authors: Boel L, Pernet K, Toussaint M, Ides K, Leemans G, Haan J, Van Hoorenbeeck K, Verhulst S

Abstract
Respiratory problems have a significant impact on morbidity and mortality in patients with cerebral palsy (CP). In particular, recurrent aspiration, impaired airway clearance, spinal and thoracic deformity, impaired lung function, poor nutritional status, and recurrent respiratory infections negatively affect respiratory status. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia may contribute to pulmonary problems, but asthma is not more common in CP than in the general population. We discuss treatment options for each of these factors. Multiple coexisting and interacting factors that influence the respiratory status of patients with CP should be recognized and effectively addressed to reduce respiratory morbidity and mortality.
WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS: Respiratory problems are a significant cause of morbidity in patients with cerebral palsy (CP). Respiratory status in patients with CP is influenced by recurrent aspiration and impaired airway clearance. Spinal and thoracic deformity, impaired lung function, poor nutrition, and respiratory infections also negatively affect respiratory status. These factors should all be addressed to reduce respiratory problems in patients with CP.

PMID: 30320434 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



Oral corticosteroids for asthma exacerbations in preschool-age children: to treat or not to treat and when?
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Oral corticosteroids for asthma exacerbations in preschool-age children: to treat or not to treat and when?

J Pediatr. 2018 Oct 11;:

Authors: Weinberger M

PMID: 30318369 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



Day-care center attendance and risk of Asthma-A systematic review.
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Day-care center attendance and risk of Asthma-A systematic review.

Allergol Immunopathol (Madr). 2018 Nov - Dec;46(6):578-584

Authors: Ochoa Sangrador C, Vázquez Blanco A

Abstract
INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Asthma and other wheezing disorders are common chronic health problems in childhood. We aim to evaluate whether the attendance by children under three years of age to day-care centers is a protector or risk factor in the development of recurrent wheezing or asthma in the following years of their lives.
METHODS: Systematic review of published cohort or cross-sectional studies, without any time limitation. We searched in PubMed, Cinhal, Cuiden and Scopus (EMBASE included). The quality of the studies was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Disagreements were solved by mutual consensus. Weighted odds ratio (ORs) were estimated using RevMan 5.3, following random effects models.
RESULTS: We selected 18 studies for qualitative analysis, nine cohort studies and nine cross-sectional studies. Day-care center attendance is associated with an increased risk of early recurrent wheezing (four studies; 50,619 subjects; adjusted OR 1.87 [1.21 to 2.88]; I2 91%) and asthma before the age of six (five studies; 5412 subjects; adjusted OR 1.59 [1.26 to 2.01]; I2 0%), but not later (five studies; 5538 subjects; adjusted OR 0.86 [0.55 to 1.32]; I2 76%).
CONCLUSIONS: Children attending day-care center during the first years of life have a higher risk of recurrent wheezing during the first three years and asthma before the age of six, but not later. This risk must be taken into account to inform parents in order to choose what kind of care children should have throughout infancy and to implement preventive measures to reduce its impact.

PMID: 30318106 [PubMed - in process]



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