Slaapstoornis Wetenschap

Notalgia paresthetica: factors associated with its perceived severity, duration, side, and localization.
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Notalgia paresthetica: factors associated with its perceived severity, duration, side, and localization.

Int J Dermatol. 2017 Jun 23;:

Authors: Pagliarello C, Fabrizi G, De Felici B, Casanova D, Feliciani C, Di Nuzzo S

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a disorder characterized by pruritus localized to the patient's back. Little is known about predictors of severity, duration, side, and localization.
OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with perceived severity, duration, side, and localization of NP.
METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, disease severity, duration, side, and localization were compared among the considered variables. Multivariate analysis was used to assess each variable contribution in predicting disease severity and its duration.
RESULTS: Sixty-five patients were recruited. Disease involved more female than male patients (Female/Male: 1.6) and after adjusting for all potential confounders, it was perceived as more severe in females (OR = 7.3, 95% CI = 2-26.3, P < 0.01). NP was reported more frequently on the right side among patients sleeping on the left side and conversely (P < 0.05). A higher disease duration was significantly linked to a higher body mass index (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.3-17.1, P < 0.05).
CONCLUSION: Our study linked female gender to worse disease severity, a higher body mass index to longer disease duration, and prevailing sleep position to NP side expression. The sleeping position should be considered a possible target for treating the disease.

PMID: 28646529 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



An investigation into the association between demographic and morbidity factors, and sleep disturbance.
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An investigation into the association between demographic and morbidity factors, and sleep disturbance.

Ir J Med Sci. 2017 Jun 23;:

Authors: Mullane N, Bradley C

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The recognition of sleep disorders is important because in the long term, they are associated with numerous deleterious health outcomes. Despite the high prevalence of sleep disorders, they are widely under-diagnosed at general practice level.
AIM: This study aims to investigate the association between demographic and morbidity factors, and self-reported sleep disturbance symptoms.
METHODS: A quantitative cross-sectional study design was used. The data collection tool was an anonymous questionnaire consisting of 22 sleep symptoms categorised into four subscales: 1. Insomnia, 2. Daytime Distress, 3. Sleep Disorder, 4. Psychological Distress. Participants were adults ≥18 years of age attending their general practitioner.
RESULTS: A total of 281 questionnaires were analysed (70.3% response rate). Participants with a diagnosis of depression and those who experienced low mood 'very frequently' had significantly higher median scores on all four subscales. Those with a body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m(2) had a higher median score on subscale 3, compared to those with lower BMIs. Smokers had higher median scores on subscales 1-3 compared to non-smokers. Participants >65 years of age had lower median scores on all subscales compared to younger participants. Married participants had lower median scores on subscales 1-3 compared to unmarried participants. A total of 37% reported that they would be willing to participate in an overnight sleep study, and 5.3% had been formally diagnosed with a sleep disorder.
CONCLUSIONS: A number of factors are significantly associated with sleep disturbance, particularly depression, low mood, elevated BMI and smoking. General practitioners should consider these factors to increase recognition of patients who would benefit from sleep disorder investigation.

PMID: 28646468 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



The Oswestry Disability Index, confirmatory factor analysis in a sample of 35,263 verifies a one-factor structure but practicality issues remain.
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The Oswestry Disability Index, confirmatory factor analysis in a sample of 35,263 verifies a one-factor structure but practicality issues remain.

Eur Spine J. 2017 Jun 23;:

Authors: Gabel CP, Cuesta-Vargas A, Qian M, Vengust R, Berlemann U, Aghayev E, Melloh M

Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyze the factor structure of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) in a large symptomatic low back pain (LBP) population using exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA).
METHODS: Analysis of pooled baseline ODI LBP patient data from the international Spine Tango registry of EUROSPINE, the Spine Society of Europe. The sample, with n = 35,263 (55.2% female; age 15-99, median 59 years), included 76.1% of patients with a degenerative disease, and 23.9% of the patients with various other spinal conditions. The initial EFA provided a hypothetical construct for consideration. Subsequent CFA was considered in three scenarios: the full sample and separate genders. Models were compared empirically for best fit.
RESULTS: The EFA indicated a one-factor solution accounting for 54% of the total variance. The CFA analysis based on the full sample confirmed this one-factor structure. Sub-group analyses by gender achieved good model fit for configural and partial metric invariance, but not scalar invariance. A possible two-construct model solution as outlined by previous researchers: dynamic-activities (personal care, lifting, walking, sex and social) and static-activities (pain, sleep, standing, travelling and sitting) was not preferred.
CONCLUSIONS: The ODI demonstrated a one-factor structure in a large LBP sample. A potential two-factor model was considered, but not found appropriate for constructs of dynamic and static activity. The use of the single summary score for the ODI is psychometrically supported. However, practicality limitations were reported for use in the clinical and research settings. Researchers are encouraged to consider a shift towards newer, more sensitive and robustly developed instruments.

PMID: 28646454 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



Meis1 effects on motor phenotypes and the sensorimotor system in mice.
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Meis1 effects on motor phenotypes and the sensorimotor system in mice.

Dis Model Mech. 2017 Jun 23;:

Authors: Salminen AV, Garrett L, Schormair B, Rozman J, Giesert F, Niedermeier KM, Becker L, Rathkolb B, Rácz I, German Mouse Clinic Consortium, Klingenspor M, Klopstock T, Wolf E, Zimmer A, Gailus-Durner V, Torres M, Fuchs H, de Angelis MH, Wurst W, Hölter SM, Winkelmann J

Abstract
MEIS1 is a developmental transcription factor linked to restless legs syndrome (RLS) in genome-wide association studies. RLS is a movement disorder leading to severe sleep reduction and with significant impact on the quality-of-life of patients. In genome-wide association studies, MEIS1 has consistently been the gene with the highest effect size and functional studies suggest a disease-relevant downregulation. Therefore, haploinsufficiency of Meis1 could be the most potential system for modeling RLS in animals. We used heterozygous Meis1 knock-out mice to study the effects of Meis1 haploinsufficiency on mouse behavioral and neurological phenotypes, and to relate the findings to human RLS. We exposed the Meis1-deficient mice to assays of motor, sensorimotor and cognitive ability and assessed the effect of a dopaminergic receptor 2/3 agonist commonly used in the treatment of RLS. The mutant mice showed a pattern of circadian hyperactivity, compatible with human RLS. Moreover, we discovered a replicable prepulse inhibition (PPI) deficit in the Meis1-deficient animals. In addition, these mice were hyposensitive to the PPI-reducing effect of the dopaminergic receptor agonist, highlighting a role of Meis1 in the dopaminergic system. Other reported phenotypes include enhanced social recognition at an older age that was not related to alterations in adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis previously shown to be implicated in this behavior. In conclusion, the Meis1-deficient mice fulfill some of the hallmarks of an RLS animal model, and revealed the role of Meis1 in sensorimotor gating and in the dopaminergic systems modulating it.

PMID: 28645892 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



Altered Populations of Natural Killer Cells, Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes, and Regulatory T Cells in Major Depressive Disorder: Association with Sleep Disturbance.
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Altered Populations of Natural Killer Cells, Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes, and Regulatory T Cells in Major Depressive Disorder: Association with Sleep Disturbance.

Brain Behav Immun. 2017 Jun 20;:

Authors: Suzuki H, Savitz J, Kent Teague T, Gandhapudi SK, Tan C, Misaki M, McKinney BA, Irwin MR, Drevets WC, Bodurka J

Abstract
A subset of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) have impaired adaptive immunity characterized by a greater vulnerability to viral infection and a deficient response to vaccination along with a decrease in the number and/or activity of T cells and natural killer cells (NKC). Nevertheless, it remains unclear which specific subsets of lymphocytes are altered in MDD, a shortcoming we address here by utilizing an advanced fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) method that allows for the differentiation of important functionally-distinct lymphocyte sub-populations. Furthermore, despite evidence that sleep disturbance, which is a core symptom of MDD, is itself associated with alterations in lymphocyte distributions, there is a paucity of studies examining the contribution of sleep disturbance on lymphocyte populations in MDD populations. Here, we measured differences in the percentages of 13 different lymphocytes and 6 different leukocytes in 54 unmedicated MDD patients (partially remitted to moderate) and 56 age and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). The relationship between self-reported sleep disturbance and cell counts was evaluated in the MDD group using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The MDD group showed a significantly increased percentage of CD127(low)/CCR4(+) Treg cells, and memory Treg cells, as well as a reduction in CD56(+)CD16(-) (putative immunoregulatory) NKC counts, the latter, prior to correction for body mass index. There also was a trend for higher effector memory CD8(+) cell counts in the MDD group versus the HC group. Further, within the MDD group, self-reported sleep disturbance was associated with an increased percentage of effector memory CD8(+) cells but with a lower percentage of CD56(+)CD16(-) NKC. These results provide important new insights into the immune pathways involved in MDD, and provide novel evidence that MDD and associated sleep disturbance increase effector memory CD8(+) and Treg pathways. Targeting sleep disturbance may have implications as a therapeutic strategy to normalize NKC and memory CD8(+) cells in MDD.

PMID: 28645775 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



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