Angst Wetenschap

Fear of Progression in Parents of Children with Cancer: Results of An Online Expert Survey in Pediatric Oncology.
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Fear of Progression in Parents of Children with Cancer: Results of An Online Expert Survey in Pediatric Oncology.

Klin Padiatr. 2018 Apr 19;:

Authors: Clever K, Schepper F, Küpper L, Christiansen H, Martini J

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Fear of Progression (FoP) is a commonly reported psychological strain in parents of children with cancer. This expert survey investigates how professionals in pediatric oncology estimate the burden and consequences of FoP in parents and how they assess and treat parental FoP.
METHOD: N=77 professionals in pediatric oncology (members and associates of the Psychosocial Association in Paediatric Oncology and Haematology, PSAPOH) were examined in an online survey with a self-developed questionnaire. Data were analyzed via descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis.
RESULTS: Three of four experts in clinical practice were (very) often confronted with parental FoP which was associated with more negative (e. g., psychosomatic reactions, reduced family functioning) than positive (e. g., active illness processing) consequences. N=40 experts indicated that they mainly assess parents' anxiety via clinical judgment (72.5%) and/or according to ICD-10/DSM-5 diagnostic criteria (37.5%), whereas standardized methods such as psycho-oncological questionnaires (12.5%) were applied less often. Only n=6 experts named a specific diagnostic approach to assess parental FoP. The most common treatment approaches for FoP were supportive counseling (74.0%), psychotherapy (59.7%) and/or relaxation techniques (55.8%).
DISCUSSION: Parental FoP is frequently perceived by experts in clinical practice. A standardized diagnostic procedure would increase comparability of diagnostic judgments and harmonize treatment indications.

PMID: 29672778 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



Biopsychosocial Profiles and Functional Correlates in Older Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Preliminary Study.
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Biopsychosocial Profiles and Functional Correlates in Older Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Preliminary Study.

Pain Med. 2018 Apr 16;:

Authors: Weiner DK, Gentili A, Coffey-Vega K, Morone N, Rossi M, Perera S

Abstract
Objective: To describe key peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) conditions in a group of older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and their association with pain severity and self-reported and performance-based physical function.
Design: Cross-sectional.
Setting: Outpatient VA clinics.
Subjects: Forty-seven community-dwelling veterans with CLBP (age 68.0 ± 6.5 years, range = 60-88 years, 12.8% female, 66% white) participated.
Methods: Data were collected on peripheral pain generators-body mass index, American College of Rheumatology hip osteoarthritis criteria, neurogenic claudication (i.e., spinal stenosis), sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain, myofascial pain, leg length discrepancy (LLD), and iliotibial band pain; and CNS pain generators-anxiety (GAD-7), depression (PHQ-9), insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index), maladaptive coping (Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, Cognitive Strategies Questionnaire), and fibromyalgia (fibromyalgia survey). Outcomes were pain severity (0 to 10 scale, seven-day average and worst), self-reported pain interference (Roland Morris [RM] questionnaire), and gait speed.
Results: Approximately 96% had at least one peripheral CLBP contributor, 83% had at least one CNS contributor, and 80.9% had both peripheral and CNS contributors. Of the peripheral conditions, only SIJ pain and LLD were associated with outcomes. All of the CNS conditions and SIJ pain were related to RM score. Only depression/anxiety and LLD were associated with gait speed.
Conclusions: In this sample of older veterans, CLBP was a multifaceted condition. Both CNS and peripheral conditions were associated with self-reported and performance-based function. Additional investigation is required to determine the impact of treating these conditions on patient outcomes and health care utilization.

PMID: 29672748 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



The impact of affect labelling on responses to aversive flying-cues.
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The impact of affect labelling on responses to aversive flying-cues.

PLoS One. 2018;13(4):e0194519

Authors: Azoum M, Clark GI, Rock AJ

Abstract
Individuals with flying phobia experience increases in subjective anxiety in response to flying-related cues. However, the cognitive processes that contribute to cue-reactive anxiety in individuals with flying-related anxiety remain poorly understood. Preliminary research suggests that changes in visual imagery and volitional control may contribute to this cue-reactive anxiety. Engaging in affect labelling during exposure therapy has been shown to reduce cue-reactive anxiety in individuals with fears relating to a variety of stimuli but has not been investigated in the fear of flying. The present study recruited 110 participants with a range of flying-related anxiety scores to complete an online cue-reactivity experiment. The study sought to evaluate whether an aversive flying cue triggered changes in imagery, volitional control and anxiety, and whether changes in imagery and volitional control predicted level of cue-reactive anxiety. Participants were randomly allocated to an affect labelling or non-affect labelling condition to additionally assess whether engaging in labelling one's emotion following exposure to an aversive flying cue would attenuate cue-reactive changes in anxiety relative to a group who did not. Significant cue-reactive changes in anxiety, and volitional control were observed from neutral to aversive flying cue were observed. After accounting for the effects of flying anxiety severity, only volitional control significantly improved the prediction of cue-reactive anxiety. Participants in the affect labelling condition reported significantly smaller increases in anxiety than the non-affect labelling group following exposure to the aversive flight cue. This is the first study to indicate affect labelling may help to regulate aspects of cue-reactive anxiety in response to aversive flying stimuli.

PMID: 29672519 [PubMed - in process]



Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Brazilian version of the Beliefs about Emotions Scale.
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Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Brazilian version of the Beliefs about Emotions Scale.

Trends Psychiatry Psychother. 2018 Mar;40(1):21-28

Authors: Mograbi DC, Indelli P, Lage CA, Tebyriça V, Landeira-Fernandez J, Rimes KA

Abstract
Introduction Beliefs about the unacceptability of expression and experience of emotion are present in the general population but seem to be more prevalent in patients with a number of health conditions. Such beliefs, which may be viewed as a form of perfectionism about emotions, may have a deleterious effect on symptomatology as well as on treatment adherence and outcome. Nevertheless, few questionnaires have been developed to measure such beliefs about emotions, and no instrument has been validated in a developing country. The current study adapted and validated the Beliefs about Emotions Scale in a Brazilian sample. Methods The adaptation procedure included translation, back-translation and analysis of the content, with the final Brazilian Portuguese version of the scale being tested online in a sample of 645 participants. Internal consistency of the scale was very high and results of a principal axis factoring analysis indicated a two-factor solution. Results Respondents with high fatigue levels showed more perfectionist beliefs, and the scale correlated positively with questionnaires measuring anxiety, depression and fear of negative evaluation, confirming cross-cultural associations reported before. Finally, men, non-Caucasians and participants with lower educational achievement gave greater endorsement to such beliefs than women, Caucasian individuals and participants with higher educational level. Conclusions The study confirms previous clinical findings reported in the literature, but indicates novel associations with demographic variables. The latter may reflect cultural differences related to beliefs about emotions in Brazil.

PMID: 29668823 [PubMed - in process]



Fear Avoidance and Clinical Outcomes from Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.
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Fear Avoidance and Clinical Outcomes from Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Neurotrauma. 2018 Apr 18;:

Authors: Silverberg ND, Panenka W, Iverson GL

Abstract
Characterizing psychological factors that contribute to persistent symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) can inform early intervention. To determine whether fear avoidance, a known risk factor for chronic disability after musculoskeletal injury, is associated with worse clinical outcomes from MTBI, adults were recruited from four outpatient MTBI clinics and assessed at their first clinic visit (M=2.7, SD=1.5 weeks post-injury) and again 4-5 months later. Of 273 patients screened, 102 completed the initial assessment and 87 returned for the outcome assessment. The initial assessment included a battery of questionnaires that measure activity avoidance and associated fears. Endurance, an opposite behavior pattern, was measured with the Behavioral Response to Illness Questionnaire. The multidimensional outcome assessment included measures of post-concussion symptoms (British Columbia Postconcussion Symptom Inventory), functional disability (World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule-12 2.0), return to work status, and psychiatric complications (MINI Neuropsychiatric Interview). A single component was retained from principal components analysis of the six avoidance subscales. In generalized linear modeling, the avoidance composite score predicted symptom severity (95% confidence interval [CI] for B= 1.22-6.33) and disability (95% CI for B=2.16-5.48), but not return to work (95% CI for B=-0.68-0.24). The avoidance composite was also associated with an increased risk for depression (OR=1.76, 95% CI=1.02-3.02) and anxiety disorders (OR=1.89, 95% CI=1.16-3.19). Endurance behavior predicted the same outcomes, except for depression. In summary, avoidance and endurance behavior were associated with a range of adverse clinical outcomes from MTBI. These may represent early intervention targets.

PMID: 29665736 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



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